Good Food and Coffee

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Archive for the month “October, 2012”

Sugar glazing Coffee beans invented in USA

                Old Coffee Roasters       
 

While researching roaster patents, I ran across this interesting 1886 coffee patent. Be sure and read the reply I received regarding this patent from 1840Coffee, AKA Donald Schoenholt of Gillies Coffee Co., New York. Thank you, Don, for sharing this wonderful historical information on Mr. Arbuckle. 

Richard Hagan

 

United States Patent Office

John Arbuckle, JR., Allegheny City, Pennsylvania.

Letters Patent No. 73,486, dated January 21, 1868

 

Improvement in Roasted Coffee.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, John Arbuckle, Jr., of the city and county of Allegheny, in the State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in “Roasted Coffee;” and I do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description thereof.

The nature of my invention consists in roasting coffee and then coating it with a glutinous or gelatinous matter, for the purpose of retaining the aroma of the coffee, and also act as a clarifying-agent when the ground coffee has been boiled in water.

To enable others skilled in the art of “roasting coffee” to use my invention, I will proceed to describe its operation or preparation.

I take any good article of green coffee, and roast ti by any of the known means. I then cool it as quickly as possible. I then prepare a mixture of the following ingredients, in about the following proportions: One ounce of Irish moss; half an ounce of isinglass; half an ounce of gelatine; one ounce of white sugar; and twenty-four eggs. I boil the Irish moss in a quart of water, and then strain it. I then boil the isinglass and gelatine in a pint of water. I then mix the sugar and eggs well together, and when the mixture of Irish moss, isinglass, gelatine, and water has become cold, I mix the whole of the ingredients into one homogenous compound. I then pour the whole over about one hundred pounds of the roasted coffee, and stir and so manipulate the coffee that each grain will be entirely coated, after the coffee is coated, and the coasting has become dry and hard, which is accomplished by forcing currents of air through it while stirring it, for the purpose of coating it with the glutinous or gelatinous matter described.

I wish it clearly understood that I do not confine myself to the above compound of glutinous matter for coating roasted coffee, for many other compounds may be formed which will accomplish the end desired, to wit, coating roasted coffee in the manner and for the purpose set forth.

What I claim, is-

Coating roasted coffee with any glutinous or gelatinous matter, for the purpose of retaining the aroma of the coffee, and also act as a clarifying-agent, as herein described and set forth.

 

John Arbuckle, Jr.

Witnesses:

James J. Johnston,

A. C. Johnston.

 

Donald Schoenholt’s reply,

 Mr. John Arbuckle, who went on to become the greatest coffee roaster of his generation and the creator of the first national brand, “ARIOSA,” was also one of the richest men in America during the gilded age of the 1880s and ’90s. Arbuckle Bros. produced ARIOSA, known as “the coffee that won the West,” and also roasted and packed several other popular brands, including their premium YUBAN brand (now owned by Kraft), which was the best selling brand in New York for years.

Arbuckle’s coffee was distributed in the age before lined paper bags, and coffee went stale and rancid pronto.  Coating, or “glazing” as it came to be known, was a way to lengthen its shelf life by keeping air away from the beans.  Many different compounds were used in the coffee trade. Arbuckle Bros. settled on a sugar based glaze.  They became such a prodigious user of sugar that they decided to enter the sugar business rather than give a profit on the huge quantities they needed to others.  The Sugar Trust didn’t like that much and decided to enter the coffee business to spite Arbuckle.  For the better part of the next generation, the Sugar Trust’s LION COFFEE battled it out with Arbuckle’s brands throughout the courts and the cities of the nation.  The first great advertising campaign in history was this coffee war.  After fought to a stand-still, the sugar boys quit the coffee business, and the Arbuckle brothers were triumphant.  They strode upon the national stage until their deaths in the early part of the 20th Century.  Their heirs sold the business to Mr. C.W. Post (of Post Toasties and Postum fame), who was putting together a little company at that time that would be called General Foods.  Mr. Post joined the Arbuckle brands with the other little roaster he had just acquired from the Cheek Neal Coffee Co.; it was called Maxwell House.

With the advent of the Pure Food & Drug Act (1906), and the development of better packaging that retained freshness longer, glazing fell out of fashion.

Sugar glazed beans, now referred to as “torrefaction coffee,” still retain a market in Spain and South America.

i840Coffee

P.S.  LION COFFEE went broke eventually and languished in the Ohio court system as just a moldy old file until found by an entrepreneur who arranged with the court to revive the brand name.  It was moved to Hawaii where the lion, after two generations of slumber, roars again as a retailer, roaster and wholesaler of Hawaiian blend coffees.

DNS

1800’S ARBUCKLE BROS. TRADE CARD * COLUMBIA

  

GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME

It will pay you well to keep a small coffee mill in your kitchen, and grind your coffee, just as you use it, one mess at a time. Coffee should not be ground until the coffee-pot is ready to receive it. Coffee will lose more of its strength and aroma, in one hour after being ground, than in six months before being ground. So long as Ariosa remains in the whole berry, our glazing, composed of choice eggs, and pure confectioners sugar, closes the pores of the coffee, and thereby all the original strength and aroma are retained. Ariosa Coffee has, during 25 years, act the standard for all other roasted coffees. So true is this, that other manufactures in recommending their goods, have known no higher praise than to say: “It’s just as good as Arbuckles.”

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Torrefacto-Roasted Coffee Has Higher Antioxidant Properties

ScienceDaily (Mar. 10, 2008) —

Torrefacto-roasted coffee has higher antioxidant properties than natural roast, according to the dissertation defended by a biologist of the University of Navarra, Isabel López Galilea. She has emphasized in her study that the addition of sugar during the roasting process increases the development of compounds with high antioxidant activity.

The researcher of Department of Food Sciences, Physiology and Toxicology of the University of Navarra analyzed eleven varieties of commercial coffee for her study, which was entitled “The Influence of Torrefacto Roasting on the Principal Components of Coffee and its Antioxidant and Pro-oxidant Capacity.”

As this scientist of the School of Sciences emphasized, numerous studies have shown the benefits of this drink. In particular, it is considered to be one of the best sources for antioxidants in the diet; these substances help to protect us against free radicals, which are a cause of premature aging and certain diseases. Coffee has an antioxidant capacity which is ten times higher than other drinks, such as red wine and tea, according to the researcher.

Antioxidant capacity varies according to preparation method

In order to carry out this research, Isabel López analyzed the coffee consumption habits of the inhabitants of Navarra, via 300 surveys. The results showed that Navarrans consume an average of 125 ml of coffee per day, with consumption slightly higher among women. In addition, they primarily consume ground coffee resulting from a mixture of natural roast and torrefacto-roast coffees, and the coffee is generally prepared with Italian or mocha coffee makers, followed by the filter, espresso and pump methods.

After confirming the increased antioxidant capacity of ground coffees roasted using the torrefacto process, she showed how these properties were present in the brewed coffee, which is the typical form of coffee consumption. In regard to the different preparation methods, she discovered that espresso machines produce a drink with the highest antioxidant capacity, more than coffee produced by the Italian, filter and pump methods. These properties may be due to the greater content of ‘brown compounds’ [compuestos pardos] developed during the roasting process, as well as to polyphenic compounds and caffeine.

In addition, she demonstrated that both the compounds contained in coffee as well as its aroma are affected by the type of roast and the system of extraction; nevertheless, this is a topic that will require further study in order to identify results under varying conditions.

In her study, Dr. López identified 34 volatile compounds with high aromatic impact on coffee drinks, and new aromatic compounds were detected, such as octanol, which produces an intense orange aroma.

Former Apple and NASA engineers create $11,000 coffee maker

Mike Flacy October 2, 2012 By 

 

Completely equipped with a digital camera and Wi-Fi connectivity, Blossom Coffee is serious about brewing the perfect cup of coffee.

Detailed on ABC News recently, a company called Blossom Coffee has designed an extremely expensive coffee maker that delivers a cup of coffee that’s been brewed at the perfect temperature. Called the Blossom One Limited, the production model was developed by MIT graduate Jeremy Kempel as well as  Matt Walliser and Joey Roth. Prior to creating the Blossom One Limited, Kempel worked for Apple developing the iPad, as well as Tesla Motors and BMW while Walliser previously worked for NASA and Formula Hybrid. When asked about the reasons behind the development of the Blossom One Limited, Kempel stated “We started with the coffee and designed around it.”

Interestingly, the Blossom One Limited comes with a variety of high-tech features. For instance, Kempel added a 1.3MP digital camera to the Blossom One Limited in order to scan Quick Response (QR) codes. Coffee roasters can add a QR code onto packaging in order to offer a helpful recipe for a specific type of bean.

In addition, information such as timing and volume can be fed back to the roaster each time a QR code is scanned. All of this data is fed into a custom Blossom application as well. Providing wireless communication, Blossom Coffee has included 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi connectivity which allows users to download new recipes. It also allows Blossom Coffee to monitor the machine’s performance remotely and prepare for service calls.

Describing the brewing process on the Blossom Coffee blog, the team writes “When a cup of coffee is to be brewed, gravity carries the specified volume of water from the reservoir to the boiler where it is heated to temperature on demand. When the water achieves the proper temperature, a whisper quiet air pump pushes it from the boiler into the brew chamber unit. Finally, heating elements in the brew chamber unit maintain the brew temperature precisely as specified by the user.”

The Blossom One Limited is definitely larger than a traditional coffee maker. While it could fit in a large kitchen provided there’s enough counter space, the height of the machine may preclude placement underneath a cabinet. The brew chamber is constructed out of glass and stainless steel to allow for higher precision.

The water reservoir automatically fills itself silently when tied into the plumbing of a home or business. The Blossom One Limited also includes a manual plunger if the user if particularly picky about their coffee. All pieces of the machine are designed to be modular in for quick cleaning.

While Blossom Coffee is targeting restaurants and small cafes for commercial use, this hasn’t stopped private individuals from inquiring about a model. The Blossom One Limited will sell for $11,111 and the wood finish can be customized to match kitchen or coffee shop cabinetry. Each unit will be hand-delivered, likely by a representative of Blossom Coffee, and the customer will receive a personalized set of instructions to learn about the technological features and general operation. Beyond the lifetime defect-free guarantee, Blossom Coffee also offers a one-year parts and labor warranty.

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/lifestyle/apple-nasa-engineers-create-11000-coffee-maker/#ixzz28Fy94Bl9

Old Brown Java

One of the most surprising finds for Filter and milk based coffee is Old Brown Java. I have ignored it for a number of years based on a false assumption that all weathered or matured coffee is like Monsooned Malabar, of which, I have no personal affinity for.

What a HUGE surprise in drinking this coffee. Rob Hodges of RAVE Coffee sent me some green beans to roast, and the instruction were simple, “make it a little dark”.

I have a lot of respect for the roast direction of Rob. He has a natural touch and instinct with coffee that only a fool would ignore, so trying to not be that fool, I took the beans into second crack for a minute and up to 225C. A quick look at the photo will show the oil on the surface, and the darkness of the bean. The colour of the bean is more even that the flash would suggest. (Click on pictures to enlarge)

The origins of Old Brown Java are interesting. The beans were used for ballast on sailing ships, and consequently the ‘weathering’, ie salt water and length of time produced the distinctive flavour of the brew. Nowadays, the beans are aged in a wetting and storing process for up to 3 years in order to emulate the same conditions as when loaded on ships.

The process itself removes a lot of acidity, whilst retaining the full depth of taste. I made 3 pots of Old Java, from 20 grams per 3/4 pint to 35 grams per 3/4 pint and was amazed at how the acidity did not increase with the added grinds. Old Java is a very mellow taste, with a wonderful ‘coffee’ aroma. In the drinking, there is a delightful sweetness to the cup, and an after taste of, slight herbacious woodiness.

I am going to try and blend it with some other beans and see what happens. Rob Hodge gave me a blend for milk based drink, and I think that I perhaps tried it a little too fresh, it didnt work for me. The Coffee is now 7 days old so will try again.

The Coffee plantations on the Island that produce Old Java are mainly on the East side. Im going to look for some video that I have somewhere of a plantation and upload it later.

I am not sure of which plantation Rob supplied me the beans from, but wherever the come from, roasted or green, Id be giving him a call on 01285 651884 and placing an order.

San Remo Coffee machine

Rob Hodge of RAVE Coffee making a takeaway latte on the San Remo Verona

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